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Companion Planting Chart (Ultimate Guide!)

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We pick our life partners based on multiple factors. But, of course, those factors differ for each of us. And if we choose the right partner, our significant other can make the world a better place to live by encouraging us to be the best version of ourselves.

A similar statement could be made about plants. Although they do not have the opportunity to select their preferred companions, we do so on their behalf. They thrive if we choose a good companion. 

On the other hand, plants end up in dysfunctional relationships when they have a bad companion. So it is in our hands to provide them with beneficial companions who will enrich and help them thrive.

 How? By the system of companion planting. 

There is a scientific basis for companion planting, but it is always a matter of trial and error to understand what works best for your plants. First, however, you must understand that all of the plants in your garden are interconnected and that with companions, they will thrive, whereas, with enemies, they will perish.

What is Companion Planting?

Companion planting is the practice of growing different crops or plants together. It is a gardening skill, and with proper companion planting, you can create a diverse and healthy garden. Although vegetable gardens remain the primary focus of this discussion, they can also include ornamental plants such as roses, lavender, etc.

Companion planting is a centuries-old practice and can be traced back to China. It is an excellent way to increase the productivity of your garden. There is almost certainly a friendly companion plant for every vegetable and fruit you grow that will greatly boost soil nutrients, repel pests, and aid other activities.

However, it is not an absolute science. We say so because, in addition to plant combinations, other factors like weather, soil condition, watering, fertilizing, etc., influence plant growth and survival. Nonetheless, this concept has gained huge popularity, especially among seasoned gardeners.

How Does Companion Planting Work?

In basic companion planting, you can assess what a plant needs and choose a plant that is likely to be able to give it.

For example, tomatoes need a lot of sun and grow tall, while carrots tender tops can be easily scorched by the sun, and don’t grow as tall as tomatoes. If you plant carrots with tomatoes, they will shade the carrots, and the sturdy roots of the carrots will help hold soil and moisture around the roots of the tomato plants.

Another example of basic companion planting is a traditional Native American companion planting. Corn is grown as a centerpiece and a climbing trellis for beans. Beans put nitrogen back in the soil, which the corn needs to flourish. Squash is added to the mix so that its large leaves will shade out weeds.

Companion Planting Chart for Vegetables

If you have or plan to have a vegetable garden, the table below can be of great assistance. Pairing the host vegetable plants with beneficial companion plants may improve the final product and add additional benefits to the garden.

As a result, we’ve included some popular vegetable names and both good and bad companion plants below. This table will undoubtedly simplify vegetable companion planting for you.

Vegetable NameCompanionsEnemiesNotes
Potato• Basil
• Beans
• Catmint
• Calendula
• Cilantro
• Horseradish
• Garlic
• Oregano
• Tansy
• Peas
• Corn
• Raddish
• Cucumber
• Pumpkin
• Turnip
• Fennel
• Sunflower
• Kohlrabi
• Squash family
• Rutabaga
• Parsnip
Potato tubers can benefit from the addition of beans.
Cilantro keeps slugs and snails, spider mites, and potato beetles at bay.
Planting calendula, tansy, and horseradish deter Colorado potato beetles.
Beets• Brassicas
• Lettuce
• Onion
• Sage
• Lettuce
• Onion family
• Bush beans
• Pole beans
• Mustard
Onions protect beat plants against borers and cutworms.
Add minerals to the soil for better results.
Asparagus• Tomatoes
• Parsley
• Petunias
• Eggplant
• Coriander
• Dill
• Marigolds
• Nasturtium
• Potatoes
• Alliums
Beans• Catnip
• Corn
• Marigold
• Cucumber
• Eggplant
• Nasturtium
• Raddish
• Marigold
Rosemary
Potato
Squash
Celery
Kale
Peas
Swiss chard
• Chives
• Leeks
• Garlic
• Onions
• Beet
• Pepper
• Sunflower
Nasturtium and rosemary help in repelling bean beetles.
Beans help surrounding plants by fixing nitrogen in the soil
Okra• Cucumber
• Pepper
• Melon
• Basil
• Annual flowering • plants
• Sweet potato
• Squash
Do not plant okras on the soil that has vines planted (except for melons and cucumbers). Wait at least one year.
Onion• Cabbage
• Summer savory
• Chamomile
• Carrot
• Beat
• Lettuce
• Marigold
• Tomato
• Strawberry
• Sweet chard
• Peas
• Beans
• Sage
• Asparagus
• Garlic
• Shallot
Cabbage a>
family
(broccoli, brussels sprouts, collard greens, kale, kohlrabi, rutabagas, turnips)
• Bush beans
• Beet
• Carrot
• Celery
• Spinach
• Thyme
• Marigold
• Nasturtium
• Potato
• Pole beans
• Tomato
• Strawberry
Carrot• Beans
• Cabbage
• Brussels sprouts
• Lettuce
• Leek
• Onion
• Peas
• Raddish
• Rosemary
• Sage
• Tomato
• Chives
• Celery
• Dill
• Parsnip
Corn• Beets
• All beans
• Cucumber
• Melons
• Parsley
• Pumpkins
• Squash
• Early potatoes
• Cabbage
• Borage
• Dill
• Marigold
• Mint
• Thyme
• Winter squash
• Melons
• Tomato
• Eggplants
• Fennel
Lettuce• Asparagus
• Beat
• Calendula
• Carrot
• Chives
• Chervil
• Cilantro
• Eggplant
• Garlic
• Mint
Melon
Squash
Nasturtium
Onion
Raddish
Turnip
• Cabbage family
• Fennel
• Mustard
• Blueberries
Cucumber • Bush beans
• Pole beans
• Corn
• Dill
• Eggplant
• Marigold
• Lettuce
• Nasturtium
• Onions
• Peas
• Raddish
• Tomato
• Sunflower
• Savory
• Potato
Peas• Bush beans
• Pole beans
• Carrot
• Celery
• Corn
• Cucumber
• Eggplant
• Parsley
• Raddish
• Early potato
• Spinach
• Strawberry
• Pepper
• Allium family
• Gladioli
Eggplant• Bush bean
• Pole bean
• Pepper
• Spinach
• Potato
• Fennel
Garlic• Tomatoes
• Potatoes
• Cabbage family
• Carrot
• Peas
• Beans
Parsley• Asparagus
• Tomatoes
• Chives
• Carrot
• Corn
• Pepper
• Onion
• Peas
• Mint
• Lettuce
• Allium family
• Late potato
Radish• Chervil
• Lettuce
• Nasturtium
• Peas
• Dill
• Mint
• Oregano
• Cabbage family
• Turnips
• Hyssop
Pumpkin
• Corn
• Marigold
• Potatoes
Spinach• Celery
• Cauliflower
• Eggplant
• Leek
• Strawberry
Spinach goes great with strawberries
Squash• Radish
• Corn
• Onion
• Dill
• Sunflower
• Legumes
• Marigold
• Borage
• Melons
• Beet
• Fennel
• Potatoes
Tomato• Asparagus
• Celery
• Carrot
• Parsley
• Marigold
• Corn
• Fennel
• Potato
• Kohl Rabi
• Cabbage
Kohl Rabi can stunt the growth of tomatoes.
Corns can affect tomato plants by attracting harmful insects.
Zucchini• Beans
• Dill
• Oregano
• Parsley
• Pepper
Radish
• Potato
• Pumpkin
Melon• Corn
• Nasturtium
• Radish
Potato

In the preceding table, we discussed how different vegetable plants could be coupled with companion plants. If you have a vegetable garden, you have many options for growing crops for companion planting based on your area’s soil type and weather conditions. That being said, below are some of the most popular companion plants that most vegetables would enjoy growing with.

  • Marigold: Marigold is a great plant that can be paired with almost every vegetable. These plants are particularly helpful in repelling nematodes that primarily attack the roots of vegetable plants. 
  • Sweet alyssum: You can also combine sweet alyssum with most vegetables, especially if they are prone to aphid attacks. Alyssum flowers lure predatory insects, like hoverflies, the larvae of which eat aphids. The flowers also attract bees, thereby helping in pollination.
  • Mint: Mint is a great herb that helps in eliminating cabbage moths and ants.
  • Nasturtium: Not only do nasturtiums look great, but also they prevent aphids from attacking host plants. These plants act as sacrificers and would lure aphids towards them, keeping the host plant safe.
  • Zinnias: Zinnias invite ladybugs into the garden, killing insects such as cabbage flies.
  • Thyme: This herb helps in repelling cabbage worms. 
  • Oregano: This herb goes with most vegetable plants and helps in most harmful insects. 

Printable Companion Planting Chart

Here is the printable chart for companion planting. You can easily download this chart in your smartphone or computer and print.

Companion Planting Chart

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Why Vegetable Companion Planting?

Vegetables that are planted with friendly, supported neighbor plants will be more disease resistant, grow heartier, and in some cases, even taste better than vegetables that don’t take these factors into consideration.

Also, studies show that plants can “talk” to each other by sending out gases and other signals. Friendly neighbor plants with compatible “chat” support each other, leading to a more beautiful and robust garden.

So make your plants happier by planting them next to their BFFs. They’ll reward you by giving juicer, tastier produce!

Herb Companion Planting Chart

Herb NameCompanionsEnemiesNotes
Mint• Spearmint
• Catmint
• Orange mint
• Lemon balm
• Peppermint

(These mint family plants can be cultivated together)
Basil• Asparagus
• Beans
• Beet
• Bell pepper
• Cabbage
• Chili peppers • Eggplant
• Marigolds
Chamomile
Oregano
Potatoes
Tomatoes
• Rue
• Cucumber
• Fennel
Plant basils at 1 foot from tomato plants, as doing so would help in enhancing the tomato production.
Basil planted neat lettuce helps in enhancing the latter’s taste.
Basil is a pro in repelling almost all garden bugs.
Sun-loving herbs• Chives
• Caraway
• Dill Summer savory
• Tarragon
• Bay
(These mint family plants can be cultivated together)
Cilantro• Leafy vegetable
• Melons
• Tomato
• Potato
• Grapes
• Kale
• Pepper
• Coreopsis
• Cosmos
• Sunflower
• Sweet alyssum
• Borage
• Calendula
• Nasturtiums
• Lavender
• Fennel
• Thyme
• Yarrow
• Tansy
Lavender and cilantro won’t grow healthy together.
Fennel produces highly toxic chemicals, which may harm cilantro.
Thyme, tansy, and yarrow have watering needs different from cilantro’s, which may stunt their growth and ultimately kill them.
Do not plant crops that tend to spread fast, as they can outgrow cilantro.
Rhubarb
• Beet
• Cauliflower
• Catnip
• Marigold
• Dill
• Bean
• Garlic
• Strawberry
• Onion
• Thyme
• Chives
• Cucumber
• Melon
• Pumpkin
• Sunflower
• Dock
• Black walnut
Borage• Tomatoes
• Squash
• Strawberries
Chives• Carrots
• Broccoli
• Cauliflower
• Parsley
• Tomatoes
• Peas
• Beans
Dill• Cabbage
• Broccoli
• Cauliflower
• Corn
• Cucumber
• Lettuce
• Onion
• Carrots
• Sage
• Tomatoes
ChervilRadish
Lemon balmSquashLemon balms are aggressive growers.
Marjoram• Cabbage
• Tomatoes
Sage• Broccoli
• Cauliflower
• Rosemary
• Cabbage
• Carrots
CucumberSage helps in repelling cabbage moths, beetles, & carrot flies
Tarragon• Brassicas • Strawberries
• Lavender
• Cabbage
• Roses
• Salad burnet
• Eggplant
• Tomato
• Shallots
• Potato
• Chives
• Basil
• Cilantro
Thyme works well for almost every plant in your garden.
It helps in enhancing the strawberry flavor.
Kale
• Allium
• Pepper
• Tomato
• Beans
• Beets
• Celery
• Cucumber
• Potato
• Radishes
• Spinach
• Sweet Chard
• Marigold
• Nasturtium
• Sweet alyssum
• Borage
• Zinnia
• Cilantro
• Dill
• Brassica family
• Sunflower
• Corn
• Oatmeal
• Barley

Growing your herb garden has its benefits. Herbs like mint, basil, etc., not only make great salad ingredients and act as medicines. And you can reap the full benefits of these herbs if you grow them with beneficial companion plants. 

Planting herbs with companion plants can have more than one benefit, including the following:

  • Pest repellents
  • Attracting pollinators 
  • Enhanced taste
  • Lesser plant disease, etc.

Hence, we have provided a table with a list of friends and foes of different garden herbs.

Other companion plants that work well for most garden herbs are listed below.

  • Anise: Anise is a quick-growing plant and can be planted with fast-growing species of plants. This herb works well with coriander, as the latter boosts its growth and germination.
  • Caraway: Caraway can be planted randomly here and there in the garden. This herb helps loosen up the soil, thereby assisting other plants in spreading their roots wider and deeper. 
  • Lavender: Suppose you want to keep moths away from your garden, plant lavender as edging around cabbage and cauliflower patches. Lavender plants attract pollinators when planted near fruit trees. In addition, lavender goes well with basil and oregano.
  • Chamomile: Chamomile and basil work well together because it increases the oil content. Therefore, combining these two herbs can provide mutual benefits by enhancing taste and smell.
  • Lovage: Lovage is a herb that has gained a good reputation as a companion plant for potatoes and other plants with tuber roots. And if you want to use this herb as a trap crop, grow it along with tomatoes, and lure tomato hornworms. Other plants that go well with lovage are fennel, catmint, and hyssop. 

Fruits Companion Planting Chart

Fruit NameCompanionsEnemiesNotes
Watermelon• Radish
• Chenopodium • album
• Oregano
• Corn
• Potato
• Nasturtium
• Marigold
• Allium
• Pole beans
• Black walnut
• Cucumber
• Zucchini
Pair watermelon plant vines only after they have grown and spread out sufficiently. Otherwise, these vines can choke the companion plants and vice versa.
Strawberry• Bush bean
• Lettuce
• Nasturtium
• Onion
• Radish
• Spinach
• Cabbage
• Potato
• Melon
• Okra
• Rose
• Chrysanthemum • Peppers
• Tomatoes
Apple• Nasturtium
• Comfrey
• Chamomile
• Dill
• Fennel
• Basil
• Mint
• Lemongrass
• Yarrow
Hazelnut• Legume
• Comfrey
• Primrose
• Coriander
• Asparagus
• Wild garlic
• Fennel
• Leek
• Beat
Hazelnut plants can be plated as barrier plants between walnut trees and other plants.
Apricot• Basil
• Tansy
• Southernwood
• Tomatoes
• Sage

Below are some of the popular companion plants that you can grow with your fruit plants. 

  • Marigold: Marigold is without a doubt the most adaptable plant when it comes to companion planting. It would go well with almost any vegetable, fruit, or flower plant. Marigolds attract pollinators while discouraging nematodes in the soil. Marigolds also self-seed, which means you won’t have to plant them every year.
  • Lupin: Lupine belongs to the legume family and helps to fix nitrogen in the soil. , its lovely blooms attract a variety of butterflies and other pollinators. 
  • Nasturtium: Nasturtiums are great-looking plants that are popular for repelling codling moths, a pest that can wreak havoc on apple trees. Hence, planting nasturtiums around the base of apple trees could prove beneficial.
  • Chives: Chives as companion plants serve dual purposes. Chive flowers attract pollinators into the garden, while their onion-like pungent smell keeps harmful pests at bay. 
  • Fennel: Fennel should be planted, if your garden is prone to pest attacks. Fennel attracts parasitic wasps that feed on various pests, helping keep your garden clean and pest free.

Flowers as Companion Plants

Planting flowers as companion plants would enhance the beauty of your garden and offer you numerous other benefits. For example, flowers can be paired with vegetables, herbs, and fruits to repel pests and lure pollinators and other beneficial insects. Furthermore, planting flower plants with other host plants will also save you time and space, as you can tend more plants at one time. 

So, below, we have mentioned some flowering plants that act great as companion plants in gardens.

  • Rose: Roses are indeed one of the most beautiful flowering plants out there. These are great in enhancing the aesthetic appeal of the garden and act towards attracting pollinators. Roses can effectively be planted with petunia, daisy, strawberry, daylilies, oregano, garlic, lavender, marigold, mint, parsley, etc. 
  • Sunflower: Sunflowers are great summertime flowers. They look beautiful and offer shade to low-growing plants and herbs. Sunflowers also make a great trellis for vines and creepers. You can grow sunflowers with onion, tomato, squash, pepper, sweet corn, dahlia, daylily, rose, zinnia, sweet pea, bean, basil, mint, and rosemary, etc.

    However, there are certain plants that you need to avoid pairing with sunflowers, including potato, corn, pole bean, and fennel. That said, sunflowers can help to control weeds. Hence, growing them in your garden could be a great idea. 
  • Marigold: Marigold is a versatile plant that can go along with several host plants. These flowering plants are highly efficient in deterring pests and keeping rabbits at bay. You can pair marigold plants with beans to confuse Mexican bean beetles. These plants also work towards thrips, whiteflies, tomato hornworms, and squash bugs. 
  • Cosmos: Cosmos can be planted in your vegetable garden to attract helpful insects like green lacewings. These insects feed on pests like aphids, scales, and thrips. 
  • Nasturtium: Nasturtiums can be planted along with vegetables, as they act as a trap crop to attract pests like aphids. They also offer protection from squash bugs and beetles. Nasturtiums can be planted with broccoli, cabbage, kale, squash, zucchini, pumpkin, tomato, etc. 
  • Zinnia: Zinnia could act as a pollinator magnet. These plants are also popular among hummingbirds. You can grow zinnia with tomato, dahlia, basil, cucumber, cosmos, pepper, etc. 
  • Calendula: Also known as pot marigold, calendula is edible and can successfully be paired with asparagus to eliminate asparagus beetles. You can also grow calendula with other vegetable plants, including cucumber, tomato, carrot, peas, etc. However, avoid planting calendula near potato plants and herbs like dill and parsnip. 

Benefits of Companion Planting

So, is companion planting just for adding a touch of diversity to the garden? Although it is one of the factors that push gardeners towards the concept, there are other benefits. 

The list below contains some of the significant and scientifically backed benefits your garden can receive through companion planting.

1. Pest Control

One of the scientific reasons for practicing planting with a companion is to keep pests at bay. There are several ways in which companion plants deter pests. Some of them we have mentioned below.

Some flowers like Nasturtium or Marigold can be used for their insect repellent qualities. Garlic and its relations can also be used to help repel insects from more tender plants. But be careful! Some plants don’t like stinky Mr. Garlic living next door to them. Plants with delicate flavors, such as peas or parsley can be overpowered by onions, garlic, and their relations.

Just as beans add nitrogen to the soil for corn in the Native American companion planting trio, other plants also add nutrients that are beneficial to the neighboring plants. Beets, for example, add minerals to the soil that aid leafy salad crops. Borage and lovage are two herbs that are the super helpful neighboring plants. Almost anything grown in their vicinity will benefit and be healthier and hardier as a result.

2. Creating a Cover of Smell

The majority of gardening literature emphasizes the importance of planting companion plants that emit a strong odor or fragrance that repels pests from the garden. The fragrance of onions, garlic, and other alliums, for example, deters pests from approaching the host plants. Fragrant herbs, on the other hand, such as mint, mask the odors of the host plants. 

Flowering plants, such as French Marigold, can also keep harmful insects, such as whiteflies, at bay. According to experts, French Marigold contains limonene, which slows the whiteflies, keeping them out of vegetable gardens.

3. Creating Visual Barriers

Insects also look for the host plants visually to mark and attack them. Hence, companion plants are often used to create a visual barrier for such insects. 

Botanists have found that visual barriers often confuse insects, and they lose the way to reach their host plants. Hence, taller plants like corn, asparagus, sunflower, sesame, etc., are planted around the host crops to camouflage them.

4. Trap Cropping

Trap cropping is another method of deterring pest attacks that could be used in conjunction with companion plants. It is about planting insect-friendly plants ahead of host plants to create a trap for pests. Its main goal is to provide pests with a more desirable plant to eat than the host plant.

This method directs pests away from your main crop. You can eliminate the trap from your garden once it has become colonized with pests. Crops like alfalfa, snap beans, yellow rockets, etc., are often used as trap crops.

5. Weed Control

Weed control can also be accomplished through plant companions. These plants can be used to cover topsoil, where weeds are expected to expand, as living mulch for the host plants. In this system, a simple philosophy works: grow a companion plant to alert the weed that the site is already covered! For example, to reduce the appearance of redroot pigweed, gardeners often grow kale and beans together.

6. Control Soil Erosion

Companion plants that cover the ground effectively can help prevent soil erosion. As a result, cultivating low-growing plants such as sweet alyssum can provide

  • Weed control.
  • Soil and water retention.
  • A delightful charm to attract pollinators and beneficial insects.
  • Offering Shade

Another benefit of growing plants with a companion is offering shade to the host plants, especially if they are heat sensitive. Also, certain species of plants thrive better in partial shade. Hence, growing taller plants like sunflowers, corn, etc., with low-growing herbs can prove highly beneficial.

7. Structural Support

Certain host plants may require structural support to grow. Growing them with tall and sturdy companion plants could be beneficial in this situation. Corn is the best companion plant for structural support in this regard. This crop is widely grown in the Native American three sisters growing technique, where it serves as a trellis for the beans. When the beans crawl up the corn stems, they help anchor them and keep them from blowing away in the wind.

8. Enhance the Soil Condition

Companion plants like legumes help enrich the soil condition by fixing the nitrogen level in it. Hence, planting host plants with beans, soybeans, peas, clover, etc., can help retain and enhance the soil condition of your garden. 

9. Shares and Saves Space

Companion plants encourage garden space sharing while also saving space. It is possible to achieve this by planting a vining plant or a creeper beneath a taller one, as the Native American three sisters growing technique does. Cultivating a fast-growing crop between columns of slower-growing crops is another option.

Tips to Get Started with Companion Planting

The idea of companion planting stems from the concept of altruism. However, it is sometimes due to reciprocal altruism, which means that both the host and companion plants benefit from each other.

Here are some points to assist you in creating a healthy and successful companion planting strategy.

1. Understand Your Host Crop

It is much easier to pair your host plants with the wrong companion plants than to pair them with the right ones. So, before you start on any plant, try to learn everything you can about it. Their nature, the pests they attract, the fragrance they emit, the growing conditions, the growing time, etc. 

Understanding these factors will assist you in selecting the best companion plants for your host plants. The tables above may be of assistance in this regard.

2. Recognize if Your Garden is Plagues by Pests

Companion planting is an excellent way to keep pests away from your garden. However, you must first understand the types of pests that commonly plague your garden for this to occur. 

Keep in mind that not all companion plants are effective at repelling all types of pests. For example, if your basil, when combined with tomatoes, can help keep hornworms and trips at bay. On the other hand, potatoes and catmint would keep potato beetles at bay.

3. Practice Polyculture

Polyculture is all about planting different flowering, fruit, and vegetable plants together. This practice is great in giving a plethora of scopes to beneficial insects and pollinators to visit your garden. 

4. Crop Rotation

Crop rotation is essential for successful companion planting. It is always advised not to grow the same family of plants in the same location year after year. Each year, rotating your crop planting locations reduces the risk of disease and insect infestations. 

Crop rotation is also beneficial for increasing crop productivity. Legumes, for example, aid in nitrogen fixation in the soil. As a result, after harvesting peas and beans, plant green leafy vegetables, cabbage, squash, and other vegetables to reap the benefits of nitrogen-rich soil and increase production.

5. Take Care of the Local Weather

You will not reap the full benefits of companion planting if you plant crops at the wrong time and in the wrong climate. Plant your crops at the proper time, whether you’re doing companion planting or crop rotation. Keep an eye on the weather in your area to avoid problems caused by rain, wind, and frost.

Summary

So that brings us to the end of our detailed post on companion planting. This strategy is simple and would require some basic knowledge of plants and gardening techniques.

Plants communicate with one another, which may seem strange to us. However, they do not communicate verbally but rather through plant signs, various gases, fragrances, etc. As a result, gardeners are increasingly focusing on planting healthy companion plants together. This is a fun way for gardening buddies to collaborate.

Companion Plants
VegetablesFruitsHerbsFlowersSpices
CucumberWatermelonBasilSunflowerGarlic
EggplantStrawberryCilantroRosePepper
OkraKale
OnionRhubarb
PotatoSpinach
Pumpkin
Tomato
Zucchini
Carrot
Cabbage
Broccoli

2 thoughts on “Companion Planting Chart (Ultimate Guide!)”

  1. I would like to get a printed copy of this chart suitable for framing for my greenhouse. How do I do that? Thanks!

    Reply

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